Why Unleashing an Angry Bear is Truly Nothing Compared to a Cute Bunny

roger_bannister  You probably already know that in 1954, Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile barrier.

But I’m betting you might not know that he did it by telling himself the best-feeling, believable story possible.

That’s right – Roger Bannister was playing “Grow a Greater You”!

I’ll Bet Bugs Bunny Was Involved in This Somehow

How did Bannister tell himself the best-feeling, believable story possible?

By using rabbits to run his record-breaking mile.

I don’t know about you, but I think a bear would’ve been a far better choice.  Wouldn’t a hungry bear chasing Bannister have made him run faster than a bunny?

Oh, right.  It wasn’t that type of rabbit.

I Guess Roger Bannister Was Too Stupid to Listen to All the Experts

Actually, legend has it that someone tried to break the four-minute mile barrier before Bannister by tying himself to a bull.  You see, prior to Bannister’s accomplishment, the track and field establishment had declared a sub-four-minute mile impossible.  Doctors had decided that a human body simply couldn’t do it.  And, up to that point, everyone was correct.

Yet Bannister decided that he was close enough to accomplishing this “impossible” feat that playing “Grow a Greater You” was the only ingredient missing.

Bannister decided to use pace runners, or rabbits, to clandestinely push him during his attempt.  He asked fellow milers to run alongside him keeping the pace necessary to complete a mile in under four minutes.  Bannister’s trick was accomplished by having his pace runners swap out with each other often enough so their combined pace never slowed.

Bannister May Have Been the First To Achieve Track and Field Fame Playing “Grow a Greater You”

Bannister, with a pace runner always in his peripheral vision, was able to nudge his subconscious into believing he was able to keep running.  He told his subconscious brain the “truth”, as far as it knew, because here was another runner, right beside them, running at the same speed.  So, Bannister’s subconscious brain reasoned, why couldn’t Bannister keep running at that speed too?

Having pace runners, who swapped out with each other upon tiring, “fool” his subconscious brain, made Bannister’s pace believable.  And, since he was actually keeping a record-breaking speed, Bannister’s pace was also the best-feeling one possible.

It wouldn’t surprise me if, at the end of the race, Bannister’s subconscious brain said, “See!  We knew it we could do it all along!  Piece of cake!”

But He Definitely Wouldn’t Be the Last

Why do I think Bannister’s brain said that?  Because a whole lot of other miler’s subconscious brains said just that, right after Bannister’s achievement.  In fact, the new record only lasted forty-six days as John Landy ran it even faster less than two months later.

Now?  Strong high school milers are able to break the four-minute mile barrier.  It’s become not only possible, but commonplace.

All because Roger Bannister started playing “Grow a Greater You” in 1946 and nudged his subconscious brain into believing it possible.  By showing himself the best-feeling, believable pace.

Your “Rabbit” is Ready and Waiting to Help You Manifest the “Impossible”

So I now ask you.  What do you currently consider impossible?

A loving relationship with a soul mate?  Financial abundance?  Career satisfaction?  A body you’ll keep the lights on to see?

What are you waiting for?  “Grow a Greater You” teaches you how to use “rabbits”, just like Roger Bannister, to demolish your “four-minute mile.”

See you at the finish line!

And stay tuned to this site for more tips and techniques for using new paradigms from quantum physics to align your beliefs with your desires and live out your dreams…

 

Posted in Grow a Greater You, Paradigms, Spirituality and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , .

4 Comments

  1. At age 12,I was flat-footed and we all had to run bare-footed in gym classes, and while i was a very muscled, 170 lb, 5’10” athlete, I ran the 50 yard dash in 7.2 minutes (P-U, phew!) No way could I have done any better — especially since one guy did the same run in 5 minutes flat (he claimed it was 4.6 minutes but the coach said he dropped the watch or something.!)

    I’m no quitter but running was never my things — I threw balls farther than any other kid in my school — softball: 125 yards, hardball 135! Football 72 yards. …and I was big enough to intimidate the other guys, so NO ONE messed with me (thus, I never had to run from anyone!).

    • Thank you, Don, for sharing your unique history.

      I like it: either learn to run fast or have no reason to run.

    • And how nice of you to say so, John. Thank you.

      I’m honored you’ve allowed my article to hold valuable meaning for you.

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