Why Should I Believe Quantum Physics When I Can’t “See” It with My Naked Eye?

ImageofFishParadigmChange  As everyone has experienced, our world functions pretty darn well using these paradigms and modern Western people are largely free from the rampant disease, poverty, starvation, and physical hardship people suffered before their creation (although many parts of our world still do experience these conditions on a daily basis).

We Still Need Better Fish Tanks

Yet, I will counter that Western people are still in need of better fish tanks (or paradigms) which can easily be seen through our continual quest for not only more personal health, success, efficacy, and ease of being, but also in the ongoing search for fulfilling personal happiness and satisfaction.  The very fact that you are reading this blog speaks clearly to the self-evident fact that, although your life is far better than a 15th Century European’s was, you are still not satisfied with your current fish tanks.  And why should you be satisfied when your inner knowing correctly tells you that better ways of achieving your goals and dreams, of being personally fulfilled, must exist?

Quantum Physics is Not Just for the Smallest Parts of Our Universe

Quantum science does govern the world we see with our naked eye – it is not relegated to the micro and macroscopic universe.  Intuitively you can discern that, if everything in the material world is made of microscopic particles, the larger objects of the material world must adhere to the properties of those particles which form them.

Yet there is another explanation which shows us that quantum physics governs the world visible to our naked eye just as it governs the micro and macroscopic and it can be illustrated using our planet.  You know that our planet is a globe, which is a fact that can be verified with your eyes simply by looking at photographs of it from outer space.  But when you walk out your front door, do you see a round Earth?  Of course not, you see a flat Earth and there is no perspective on our Earth from which you can see its roundedness with your naked eye.  And this is because of the relative size of you versus the Earth, your relative perspective to it.  You are too tiny to have the perspective to see the Earth as a globe unless you leave it and look down from space.  In this manner, perspective also alters your ability to see quantum effects with your naked eye in various ways.  Yet, just as you know the Earth is round even when it looks flat from your perspective, you can also rest assured that quantum physics is governing the behavior of the entire material world even when it still looks like a classical physics world to your naked eye.

The Scientific Explanation for Why We Can’t See Quantum Effects

And there is one fundamental quality of microscopic particles, about which you’ll learn more later, that reveals exactly why the material world visible with your naked eye almost always appears to be one governed by the old science of classical physics: microscopic particles are not actually particles at all. Sub-atomic particles, strange as this might sound, are not actually tangible, physical objects; they are merely possibilities.

Until they are manifest into concrete material objects (which occurs when they are observed), sub-atomic particles exist in a state of pure potential, they are neither particle nor wave and are completely unformed.  The act of observing a sub-atomic particle is what makes it take a definite form and, once in a form (we call observed particles which have taken a definite form a “localized time-space event”) they largely no longer exhibit quantum properties visible to your naked eye.  And, since everything you see with your naked eye is a localized time-space event, it is largely (yet) impossible to observe quantum effects on an everyday level.  Yet, even when they are a localized time-space event, the sub-atomic particles which comprise every material object still retain their quantum properties and abilities.

Additionally, I will add that quantum effects are being found in visible objects.  Buckyballs, relatively huge molecules made of carbon atoms, and even small diamonds have demonstrated quantum effects on a less than microscopic level.  And, recently, physicists Andrew Cleland and Aaron O’Connell (in two separate experiments) created objects, viewable to the naked eye, that each demonstrate quantum effects we can see.  Although the term “see” is relative because it’s probably more accurate to say that their quantum effects can be measured, which is still an amazing feat considering the challenges physicists faced as described above.