How to Hack Yourself

Celso Antonio Almeida asked if we live in a holodeck.  A holodeck like the one made famous in Star Trek: The Next Generation.

I ran with the idea.  I hope you take it to anaerobic un-exercise too.

 

Okay – It’s a Holodeck

 

Let’s say this is a holodeck.  While it’s not necessarily one literally, there’s a strong metaphor there.  We are a temporary deviation from an energy state, so I can see the holodeck comparison.

 

If It’s a Holodeck, Though, What’s Going On?

 

In your holodeck, you probably want the same thing I do in mine.  You probably want more control over experiences.  You want to experience more intimacy, connection, wealth, and success.  And experience less separateness, loneliness, doubt, and timidness.

You, like me, want to rewrite the holodeck’s software.  So you can experience more things the way you want.

 

You Aren’t Doing Anything Wrong

 

Fortunately, from my perspective, the software is not only accessible, it’s also rewritable.

The software is you.  You give meaning and value to everything and, thus, create every experience.

Your thoughts, desires, and actions influence your holodeck immensely.  Your fulfilling experiences are testimony to that.  You have lots of great experiences.

Some of your experiences don’t respond as well.  Rewriting the software, however, can change some of those experiences.

 

You’re Not the Only Cause

 

If life is a holodeck, doesn’t that suggest experiences are somewhat subjective?  Yes.  But your experiences are not subjective, they are the ones you have.  Subjectivity simply means the software can be rewritten.

 

Hack Yourself

 

Want to hack yourself?  Try this, while in an anaerobic state:

  • When you feel really angry, also search for fear
  • When you’re really scared, also search for anger
  • When you find the other, you find a raw wound
  • A wound can heal

Healing a wound can re-write the software

 

 

 

Note:

Consider joining this independent Facebook group, Grow a Greater You.  You’ll meet friends who enjoy discussing ideas like these.

Disclaimer:

Our discussions in the comment thread need to be civil and respectful.  I am the sole determiner of what constitutes civility and respect

A Solution From a Source You Might Not Have Guessed

Marty Bernstein asked about how I live my way into a new emotional reference point.

Being fully present with all my emotions has proven to be a key for living my way into a new emotional reference point.

 

Pain and Fear Are Important

 

Working up the Emotional Reference Chart is about gradually moving into less painful experiences. The degree to which I ignore fear and anger can have a direct effect upon how painful an experience is. Thus, ignoring any fear and anger can obstruct my way to a new emotional reference point.

 

Some Solutions Can Make the Problem Worse

 

After all, ignoring fear and anger invariably requires ignoring the things that create those feelings. The more I ignore, the higher the potential for a painful experience. In a gross irony, ignoring fear and anger can often cause more pain than simply feeling them in the first place would’ve.

 

Pain Can Help Allow Pleasure

 

Allowing myself to feel more fear and anger means I’m probably going to pay more attention to things which cause those feelings.  And, counterintuitive as it may seem, the more fear and anger I feel, the more pleasing an experience can become. Thus, living my way into a new emotional reference point can be said to hinge on self-honesty about painful feelings.

 

More Honesty Can Provide More Intimacy and Connection

 

The best solutions can often be found in the things you thought were the problem.  The more I allow myself to feel afraid and angry, for example, the more intimacy and connection I can experience with my wife.  Living my way into a new emotional perspective usually involves deeper honesty about fear and anger than it does a deeper understanding of the experiences I desire.

 

 

Note:

Consider joining this independent Facebook group, Grow a Greater You.  You’ll meet friends who enjoy discussing ideas like these.

Disclaimer:

Our discussions in the comment thread need to be civil and respectful.  I am the sole determiner of what constitutes civility and respect

How You Can Make a Better Decision

Denise Finch asked about how to make fewer choices which turn out not so good, although they initially seemed like good ones.  I ran with it today to write this post.

It’s Easy to Make a Great Decision Afterward

 

In retrospect is the only way you can view such a choice, of course.  Since you think it’s a good one when you make it, you only discover otherwise afterward.  And hindsight is almost always 20/20.

 

Blinded By “Need”

 

I recommend looking at the “need” which caused you to ignore potential warning signs.  In retrospect, you can discover what you’re missing.  That void, that “need”, is a wound, raw enough to create a painful experience.

 

Not Paying Attention Is Risky

 

Painful experiences can be caused by wounds you’re not actively healing.  When a wound is raw, you have to stop paying attention to information which might inflame it.  Whenever you’re not paying attention, you leave yourself more open to pain and harm.

 

Enlightened by Healing

 

Alternatively, healing your wounds can be the best measure against making bad choices which initially seemed like good ones.  The more present and aware you are, the higher the probability you’re going to make better decisions.

 

Note:

Consider joining this independent Facebook group, Grow a Greater You.  You’ll meet friends who enjoy discussing ideas like these.

Disclaimer:

Our discussions in the comment thread need to be civil and respectful.  I am the sole determiner of what constitutes civility and respect.